The Green New Deal


#202

I only took HSR once in England ( London to Paris) and it cost me just under 500 pounds return, mind you it was first class ( and worth it)

The prices in economy I think started around 58 pounds return, but if you buy refreshments in economy they charge you an arm and a leg.

rail is cheaper than air flight.


#203

Once again you seem to be missing the point. The Green New Deal is about big Government pushing its climate agenda down our throats.

Our current transportation infrastructure is what it is, because that is what the market forces have given us. Innovation in rail will take place if and when the market changes. Big Government interference isn’t innovation. It is big government interference.


#204

It is often the government who pushes innovation.


#205

That simply isn’t true. Actually quite the opposite is more accurate. Having worked in the government, I have first hand experience.


#206

Internet, mass transit, green energy, innovation in individual travel (rail, cars), safety standards.

Maybe “often” is the right operative word. But government has pushed major changes.


#207

You are confusing innovation with big government regulation.


#208

Industrialization, capitalism, and private sector innovation has pushed major change. Government generally only gets in the way.


#209

say what?
the government often is pushing innovation?
you cant be serious dude?

You are pulling our legs right?


#210

Bingo!!! :+1:


#211

I gave examples where government started innovation. They may not have finished but they start some fairly major changes… for the better.


#212

amen and exactly.
I mean it was the state of Virginia that created the I phone? oh no it was Apple

I mean it was the democratic people’s republic of California that created “windows”

It was the State of Michigan that created General motors, Ford and Chrysler

Of course they will tell the government created the internet but it was the private sector that made it take off and changed our lives


#213

You gave examples where government interfered. Mandating a green agenda is not innovation, it is government interference.


#214

Actually it was Al Gore who invented the internet. :rofl:


#215

What a dopey comment. The government is the least innovative institution on the planet. The government taxes and regulates, usually without the consent of the people. Anything you have attributed to being “government innovations” were actually private sector innovations that the government partially funded. Some of that funding worked out well. Most of it has not.


#216

Internet? Mass transit?


#217

The internet… mass transit. 2 examples of government lead innovation.

The government always taxes with the consent of the people. Our elected officials represent us, or they should. Either way they vote for us.


#218

the department of defence created it and the private sector ran with it and Bill Clinton’s administration blossomed because of it

For the government so called innovation there are millions of innovation by the private sector

do you deny that?


#219

Wrong. The internet we use today was invented by Xerox.

The earliest rail systems in the US were built and operated by private companies.


#220

Nope - DARPA funded the research. They didn’t create it. It also isn’t the internet that we use today. The DARPA project first started in the 40s and then advanced in the 60s. It was mainly point to point communications between systems. Xerox created the model for the internet we have today, they just didn’t realize it at the time.


#221

The government didn’t invent the internet by any stretch of the imagination.

"As you might expect for a technology so expansive and ever-changing, it is impossible to credit the invention of the Internet to a single person. The Internet was the work of dozens of pioneering scientists, programmers and engineers who each developed new features and technologies that eventually merged to become the “information superhighway” we know today.

Long before the technology existed to actually build the Internet, many scientists had already anticipated the existence of worldwide networks of information. Nikola Tesla toyed with the idea of a “world wireless system” in the early 1900s, and visionary thinkers like Paul Otlet and Vannevar Bush conceived of mechanized, searchable storage systems of books and media in the 1930s and 1940s. Still, the first practical schematics for the Internet would not arrive until the early 1960s, when MIT’s J.C.R. Licklider popularized the idea of an “Intergalactic Network” of computers. Shortly thereafter, computer scientists developed the concept of “packet switching,” a method for effectively transmitting electronic data that would later become one of the major building blocks of the Internet."

The government also didn’t invent mass transit.

"Mass transit has been part of the urban scene in the United States since the early 19th century. Regular steam ferry service began in New York City in the early 1810s and horse-drawn omnibuses plied city streets starting in the late 1820s. Expanding networks of horse railways emerged by the mid-19th century."

http://oxfordre.com/americanhistory/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780199329175.001.0001/acrefore-9780199329175-e-28