Medical marijuana and Firearms

People who register with the state of Ohio to legally use medical marijuana will be prohibited from possessing firearms under federal law, according to guidance released by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms.

Let’s discuss…

The root problem is marijuana being illegal on the federal level. Ever wonder why it took a constitutional amendment to outlaw alcohol but not pot?

Pot is a psychoactive substance so I can see the desire to separate weapons from those using the substance.

On the other hand it is a convenient opportunity to chip away at the Second and gun ownership.

Not surprised at the hidden caveat and doubt those getting Rx pot are going to fuss much.

:man_judge:t3:

This CCW issue was never widely publicized. A lot of people are going to be putting themselves in a bad situation. If you are caught with a CC firearm and have on your procession a medical marijuana card you are going to jail.

Are people who purchase alcohol barred from concealed carrying? What makes pot different?

Kind of ironic isn’t it? Those pushing to expand pot are also same people that want to violate their second Amendment rights for smoking it.

You can’t make this shit up, the ignorance of people.

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Yeah makes about as much sense as “zero tolerance policies” in states where its legal. What I do on my own time outside of work shouldn’t be any of my employer’s business. And for some reason, it always seems to be the same group of people that end up being “randomly” drug tested.

Over 2/3rd’s of all the United States have now either legalized cannabis for recreation, or medicinal purposes, including our nation’s capital.

We crossed that 2/3rd’s threshold just last November, so I expect to see a federal action to reschedule cannabis by election day of 2020. This firearms prohibition won’t last in the courts.

Indeed. There is no delegated power for the federal to outlaw domestic products or produce among the several States. None at all. The trick the federal initially, IIRC, used was to require a tax be paid on MJ but then they essentially refused to let people pay the tax (buy the stamp I think it was). That represented a fundamental abuse of power.

But then abusing powers granted or stealing powers not granted is just how the federal rolls.

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Oh, it goes deeper.

I’d wager that the same folks who are most vocal about legalizing pot are most vocal about ending tobacco.

… of course that may not be entirely inconsistent given that I recall a study out of California that suggested that tobacco smoke can help kill a pot buzz…

Oh I have no doubt. I had one pot head tries to convince me pot smoke doesn’t give cancer…in fact he tried to convince me it help prevent lung cancer.

Lib logic… :wink:

Stupidest thing I see on this are the people who pretend smoking pot is medicinal. No sane doctor is going to prescribe inhaling any product of combustion as a medicine.

Not me, I plan to keep my spliffs, and my guns.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has owned the patent on using cannabinoids as neuro-protectants and anti-oxidants since 2003.

https://patents.google.com/patent/US6630507B1/en

And there are hundreds of other government-sanctioned/published studies on how cannabis kills tumor cells. This isn’t a secret, it’s a control measure, and a profitable one at that.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1576089
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20090845
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/616322
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14640910
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19480992
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15275820
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15638794
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16818650
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17952650
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20307616
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16616335
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16624285
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10700234
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17675107
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14617682
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17342320
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16893424
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15026328

Uterine, testicular, and pancreatic cancers

http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/cam/cannabis/healthprofessional/page4
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20925645

Brain cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11479216

Mouth and throat cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20516734

Breast cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18454173
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16728591
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9653194

Lung cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25069049
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22198381?dopt=Abstract
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21097714?dopt=Abstract

Prostate cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12746841?dopt=Abstract
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3339795/?tool=pubmed
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22594963
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15753356
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10570948
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19690545

Blood cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12091357
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16908594

Skin cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12511587
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19608284

Liver cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21475304

Cannabis cancer cures (general)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12514108
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15313899
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20053780
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18199524
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19589225
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12182964
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19442435
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12723496
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16250836
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17237277

Cancers of the head and neck

http://ww.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2277494

Cholangiocarcinoma cancer

http://ww.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19916793
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21115947

Leukemia

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15454482
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16139274
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14692532

Cannabis partially/fully induced cancer cell death

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12130702
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19457575
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18615640
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17931597
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18438336
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19916793
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18387516
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15453094
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19229996
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9771884
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18339876
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12133838
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16596790
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11269508
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15958274
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19425170
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17202146
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11903061
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15451022
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20336665
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19394652
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11106791
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19189659
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16500647
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19539619
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19059457
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16909207
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18088200
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10913156
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18354058
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19189054
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17934890
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16571653
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19889794
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15361550

Translocation-positive rhabdomyosarcoma
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19509271

Lymphoma

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18546271
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16936228
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16337199
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19609004

Cannabis kills cancer cells

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16818634
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12648025
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17952650
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16835997

Melanoma

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17065222

Thyroid carcinoma

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18197164

Colon cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18938775
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19047095

Intestinal inflammation and cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19442536

Cannabinoids in health and disease

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18286801

Cannabis inhibits cancer cell invasion

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19914218

Virtually every system in our body is designed with cannabinoid receptors.

2 Likes

Cannabinoids in health and disease.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18286801

Abstract

Cannabis sativa L. preparations have been used in medicine for millennia.

However, concern over the dangers of abuse led to the banning of the medicinal use of marijuana in most countries in the 1930s.

Only recently, marijuana and individual natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as chemically related compounds, whose mechanism of action is still obscure, have come back to being considered of therapeutic value. However, their use is highly restricted.

Despite the mild addiction to cannabis and the possible enhancement of addiction to other substances of abuse, when combined with cannabis, the therapeutic value of cannabinoids is too high to be put aside.

Numerous diseases, such as anorexia, emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Tourette’s syndrome, Alzheimer’s disease), epilepsy, glaucoma, osteoporosis, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, and metabolic syndrome-related disorders, to name just a few, are being treated or have the potential to be treated by cannabinoid agonists/antagonists/cannabinoid-related compounds.

In view of the very low toxicity and the generally benign side effects of this group of compounds, neglecting or denying their clinical potential is unacceptable–instead, we need to work on the development of more selective cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists and related compounds, as well as on novel drugs of this family with better selectivity, distribution patterns, and pharmacokinetics, and–in cases where it is impossible to separate the desired clinical action and the psychoactivity–just to monitor these side effects carefully.

Natalya M. Kogan, MSc
Natalya M. Kogan, Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products Dept, Pharmacy School, Ein-Kerem Medical Campus, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel;

Raphael Mechoulam, PhD
Raphael Mechoulam, Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products Dept, Pharmacy School, Ein-Kerem Medical Campus, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel;

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Just one more in so many to strip a citizen of their rights ! Many State are legalizing pot , yet the very same (dem) States are using it as a means to take away your guns . :crazy_face:

It may for some. It looks to be codified into state legislative acts, so it won’t matter if feds reschedule.

It is a grand pot for guns program.

nogunemoji

Won’t hold up in the courts. Cannabis has been in use for millennia. The US only took a less-than-a-century break from its everyday use shortly after alcohol became re-legalized.

Hell it’s same people mostly. Those that fought for pot rights are the one pushing to enforce gun ban. :rofl:

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Cynically: they had to do something to keep all that payroll active, could just fire them just because their reason for employment had gone. That might set a bad example and hurt morale of other departments.