Actresses Lori Loughlin, Felicity Huffman among 40 charged in college exam cheating plot


#81

Really? You’d sell your parent’s out like that? Holy cow.

How about if there is a question they just re-test and all can be put aside. They can progress on their own merits like everyone else.


#82

I’ve read a different interpretation: If you donate a building you have to trust that you’re going to get what you’re really paying for, and everybody knows that your kid only got into the elite school because you donated the building. But if you find somebody in the college who can finagle acceptance in exchange for a bribe, you get a greater assurance of admission and nobody knows that your kid didn’t qualify to get in through the front door.

I get the larger argument about how it’s not really a bribe to pay for the building, to make a large donation, and the like, but it seems like a pretty fine line – if a college develops a reputation for taking large donations with a wink and a nudge but then not admitting the children of the donors, those donations will go to other schools.


#83

In my experience, relying on the assurance that “it’s not really a bribe” is basically the politeness that creates an air of propriety where there really is none.

It’s hard to point to examples that aren’t totally egregious where this tactic doesn’t work. Even the egregious ones often succeed — some of them even become president.


#84

Something I would like to know…not for any reason other than curiosity, is how well those kids are doing in school. Are their grades good, or are they struggling, because some of these schools are very hard and there is a reason they reject some people. They can’t do the work.

Think about some of these kids (if they didn’t know) what it must feel like to have parents that have so little confidence in you they feel they have to cheat for you. That would be really hard for me if that happened to me.


#85

Lori Loughlin’s daughter was apparently very clear on IG that she wasn’t in school for school, but for the partying. She also apparently missed the first part of her first semester last fall because she was traveling to Fiji for…I don’t know why. Apparently she does paid endorsements on IG.

She wasn’t interested in school.


#86

As long as the students didn’t know or weren’t involved in the crimes, I wouldn’t take anything away from them. Even if there was corruption getting into college, they still need to pass their courses on their own to get their diplomas.

However, feel free to throw the book at their parents.


#87

The gentleman’s C is a real phenomena.

Once you are accepted into a college, it’s very difficult to flunk out it you show u for class and do you assignments.

So even under qualified students will survive the most rigorous colleges - assuming they put in some effort - with a mediocre grade.

They are all probably doing fine.


#88

I agree, but I think the colleges should offer a spot in next years class to someone on who was on the waiting list for the years in question. One person per cheater.

But obviously first, if teh student was found to have know of the scam - out they go.


#89

I wonder why her mother felt so strongly about spending so much money to get her into a school then?

It’s not like she needs an education to advance herself financially. And it’s not like she’s going to bother getting an education.

Wealthy people just want stuff I guess. And her mom wanted a kid in a good school. So she bought it.


#90

That would depend on whether they were taking STEM (where they would have to know their shit) or soft brained stuff like Sociology where all they have to do is parrot the prof’s egotistical political rants and get an A.


#91

Well first, you have to provide the facts to make that argument! Second just on the speculative side of things, you do raise an interesting question as what happens next for the Children of these parents.

There are consequences for our parents actions regardless of innocence of their off-spring. Just to be clear also, we are talking college, not some private institution such as "K through 12 in which this was happening, these young adults would have known about what their parents were doing in order to gain admissions into these prestigious colleges, so there is some level of culpability on their part.

To answer your question more directly, I don’t believe the children should face criminal charges, but I do believe they will be forced to live with their own complicity and thus will be forced to make a decision to take corrective action, such as taking responsibility for themselves. Perhaps for some, who actually do feel some level of remorse that they start over and do it the right way, especially for those who want to go on to graduate schools. Maybe for others start a process such as starting a scholarship Non-profit ORG to grant disadvantaged students who want to go to college the opportunity to be awarded funding based on academic achievement as a way to provide restitution. Others who are just plain lazy, narcissistic self indulgent a-holes, well, they probably will either get a job that these same parents will provide for them and won’t really be affected realizing their college education is forever stained, but most should be expelled and forced to deal with the consequences. I know if I was an employer and was looking at resumes for consideration of hiring, if any of these students were applying for a job with my company I would simply rejected them based on this incident. For the simple fact that they can not be trusted to perform the tasks with 100% integrity, but of course there are exceptions, but such exceptions would have to meet a higher bar such as what I outlined earlier in terms of taking responsibility. So yeah, in reality this is what most of these students will face lest they completely change their name, and start over with a completely different identity, and with the latter, in this day in age of digital footprint and being able to do thorough back ground checks, that seems like a route that some will likely consider taking.


#92

Wrong! Want to bet?

These were prolific donors to the political elite and gave considerable amount of money to the Democratic cause, with the exception of a few Republicans which god only knows what political favors they were hoping in return for that.

———(Felicity) Huffman

“when not acting, is a generous donor to Democratic candidates. Huffman has donated thousands of dollars since 2016 to Sen. Kamala Harris (D., Calif.), according to the Federal Election Commission’s site. Prior to that, she donated frequently to President Barack Obama’s election efforts.


—-Gordon Caplan of Greenwich, Connecticut, co-chairman of the international law firm Willkie Farr & Gallagher –

“…gave the maximum allowable donation to Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign. He donated an additional $25,000 to the Hillary Victory Fund and $22,300 to the Democratic National Committee in 2016, months before Clinton lost to Donald Trump. Caplan began giving to Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D., N.Y.) in 2005.


——–Robert Flaxman owner of Crown Realty and Development

“…donated to Clinton’s campaign and gave thousands of dollars to the Democratic Party in states including Colorado, Maine, Missouri, Nevada, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin.


—-Agustin Huneeus is a winemaker in California.

During the 2016 cycle, Huneeus gave $33,400 to Clinton’s super PAC. He’s given over $150,000 the DNC and DCCC, $60,000 the Nancy Pelosi Victory Fund, $10,000 to Sen. Kamala Harris (D., Calif.)


———Jane Buckingham is the founder and president of Trendera, a boutique marketing firm

She gave $35,800 to the Obama Victory Fund and $30,800 to the DNC in 2012. She gave more than $22,000 to support Gillibrand’s races.

As far as I am concerned, celebrity status is the new Aristocracy in the modern age, and this is just the beginning! They are all fair game so stop trying to frame an argument with a pigeon hole perspective by cherry picking the context, when in reality it is much broader in the narrative of corruption and liberlism!


#93

I wonder if the kids knew about it. Was someone taking their tests for them or someone giving them fake grades?


#94

Of course the kids knew about it, and yes someone else was taking their ACT and SAT tests for them! We are not talking about 6, to 9 year olds, but young adults knowing perfectly well of their overindulgence’s in today’s culture as opposed to spending time studying where getting into college prior to graduating from high school had to have been contemplated not only by them, but their parents as well.


#95

So if a parent steals a car and gives it to their kid, the kid should be allowed to keep it? No sorry, if your kid got in through fraud and bribery they need to be shown the door, whether they knew about it or not.


#96

Like anyone else, the wealthy are going to use every means at their disposal to benefit themselves and their loved ones, legal and not-so legal. It’s something that transcends race and political affiliation.

The shocking aspect of this story is not that these shenanigans go on, but that they got caught.


#97

I agree. As a society we assign way too much credibility, legitimacy, and authority to individuals simply because they are wealthy, famous, or both.


#98

That’s a good point.

I think you are right. They have to go. Otherwise, the parents will in fact have gotten exactly what they wanted - all the privileges associated with attendance in an elite school for their kids.


#99

Oh this is so rich! Daughter was on spring break celebrating on USC official Yacht when she learned her mother was charged with bribery! Priceless!


#100

Question though, how is this a federal beef? As far as I know and can tell, federal bribery statutes cover bribing public officials, not private or commercial individuals. Some states make commercial bribery illegal but the feds don’t.

https://bribery.uslegal.com/federal-laws-on-bribery/