The Joe Biden Thread

Exactly , even the republicans turned on him !!!

2 Likes

2 Likes

I’m old enough to think that I’ll be dead when the shit hits the fan, but not old enough to remember JFK. I came of age during Nixon, and had a draft card. I grew up with the hippie counterculture, “All You Need is Love” and “Give Peace a Chance.” By the time I turned 18, I knew it was all a bunch of softheaded BS (except the one thing I internalized - always question authority). Alas, my generation internalized the foolish BS and just swallowed a new, more malignant authority that can’t be questioned. When I came of age, there were revolutionaries like the SLA, remnants of the Weather Undergound, Black Panthers, etc. I knew alot of their sympathizers - coffee-house communists who imagined that the USSR was a utopia. I was sure that the US had too much in its DNA to ever let those types get control - but I was wrong. Now they’re in control.

Obama was the straw that broke the camel’s back. He reminded me of those coffee-house commies and he was smart enough to not make it explicit. Instead he completed the total takeover by the left of every corner of the US government, the media, academia, popular culture.

My “solution?” Enjoy life while I can, and not get too angry at the way things are going. I think that this is an example of how people can be individually smart, but behaving in groups, people can do foolish, stupid and even evil things that they wouldn’t do as individuals.

We had a good run, standing on the shoulders of great people like our founding fathers - but it seems to be over. Government has gotten too big, too good at manipulating the masses. We might have a chance if government could be slashed to a third of what it is, but it won’t until the shit hits the fan - and when it does, all of the effort will be in assigning blame, by the same people who got us where we are (or their evil spawn).

2 Likes

Wtf! He sits down for no media access, except with a cross dresser

It sounds about right.

When you say hippy or Hippie (not sure of the correct spelling) does that include the dead head crowd and Haight Ashbury cult followers? (not sure of the spelling again)

I think Karl Marx is responsible for more deaths than any one ever in human history, although I could be completely wrong on this matter, but never understood how one such historical figure for good or for bad depending on your views, could ever possibly experience so many incarnations to be resurrected so many times to experience new love affairs on the basis of romanticism. I know Obozo was one of them and his mentor Franklin Davis Marshall who paid for Obozo’s way through Columbia was the set up for the Manchurian Candidate that which we reaped all the benefits from that you so aptly described. Its a story yet to reach its final conclusion, but as you said just live your life as best as you can because in the end it really doesn’t matter, we are a wretched species anyway!

2 Likes

I’d like to disagree with you, but I can’t. I’m probably about 5 years or so younger than you (63).

Hah I’m a California native but was too young to enjoy the “summer of love,” too far away too. I’ve probably been past the Haight-Ashbury a few times, but by the time I turned 18 it was already a place that you avoided. By then I was in southern California, enjoying the beach, the 70’s and chicks in bikinis.

I’ve never even seen The Grateful Dead live, I always considered them a mediocre rock band - not bad but nothing that blew my socks off. I was more of a Jethro Tull, Yes and Alice Cooper fan. Alice Cooper once famously said “We put a stake through the heart of the love generation” and I kind of agree. That generation of rock music had much less to say pompously about politics, I think they were realizing themselves that these pearls of anti-establishment wisdom were from people who never had a deep thought.

I agree they weren’t the greatest rock band, however they were the most successful touring band ever, selling out most shows they played in back in the 80’s and 90’s respectfully up until Garcia’s death in 95. I was fortunate enough to see Sting open up for them in 93 while on a furlough and on an invite from my friend in Buffalo New York who was my brother in arms at the time. What was observed is the tailgating before, during and after concerts that was always the main attractions and Orchard park was always the biggest draws so much so I believe “Terripan Station and Trucking” were songs dedicated to their much loved stops and loyal followers there. Nevertheless it was an interesting experience to see all the dead heads with their acid drops and Whippets indulgences dance around like zombie like clowns worshiping Gerry Garcia; he was their God in most respects. Two years later, I was having a beer in a place called Broadway Joe’s when the announcement of Gerry Garcia bought the farm. Being obliviously drowned in my suds, I haven’t noticed as did most in the bar at that time that it was on fire before recognizing the firemen entering and ushering us out. Before the inferno, we watched the ring of fire encasing the rear door of the place as an illuminating light creating a surreal like spectacle where some thought it was Gerry’s spirit entering the place. No shit! I had a few laughs on my travels. (True Story)

Alice Cooper on the other hand, its true they did put a stake through a generation and was by far one of the most underrated influential rock bands of it’s era. While most people would assume that it was Led Zeppelin that had the most influence on ushering in the Heavy metal genre, I would argue that it was more so spurned on by Alice Cooper’s music that had more to do with it, although that is rather subjective and a debate for another time. Nevertheless I was more of a 80’s music connoisseur with the likes of “The Clash”, “Peter Gabriel”, “English Beat” Echo and the Bunnymen", “Simple Minds”, “The Smiths” and Depeche Mode as some of my favorites, way too many to list. But the ushering in of the MTV era (back when they actually had music) was a magical time in music.

Wish I could have seen Jethro Tull, and the madman Ian Anderson. A friend of mine saw them play in Central Park and said he remembered when someone threw a lit joint on stage to which Ian picked it up and took a big took and exhaled his smoke through his flute with veins popping out of his forehead in a mad fury of musical notes that got the crowd stirred to possession. They had a lot of great songs “Thick as a Brick”, “Locomotive Breath,” “Cross eyed Mary,” “Aqualung” and their Album “Songs from the Wood” was one album I actually bought.

Can never go wrong with Southern California. I have family still living in Culver City. Although San Diego will always be a city of envy to live in but always way too expensive. I love Art Decco of LA and the entire 'LA Confidential" scene of scandalous seedy details of Bugsy Segal and the Movie stars and their acolytes making their rounds in the city’s lore of the 40’s and 50’s.

I saw Tull on their Thick as a Brick tour, and Alice Cooper on the School’s Out tour. Two opposites - Tull was all about the music (some of the best of rock music, and maybe the most memorable rock concert I’ve been to), Cooper was a bunch of guys goofing around. Then, I saw Tull 10 years ago, and it was disappointing, I said they were washed up. I saw Cooper about five years ago at a casino outside of Sacramento, and they were excellent, not the gang of goofballs they were in their prime.

3 Likes

I’ve thought about this a lot. Yes, Marx has been the inspiration for many truly horrible catastrophes in the 20th century. I don’t give him all of the blame, because there were many dreamers of utopia in the 19th century, and in some ways I kind of understand it - Europe in those days was still ruled by aristocracies, who owned all of the land. I despise those aristocrats (like the contemptible King Charles), too, the ones who are left. Yes, his stuff was poisonous, but at his time there was alot of it going around. There have always been dreamers who can see some theoretical utopia. It was the real bad guys who acted on it who showed how poisonous that thinking is - Lenin, Stalin, Mao, etc.

What is really hard to wrap my head around is how people could buy it after all of the experience of the 20th century. By the time I started looking around, it was crystal clear that it was something to be feared and opposed, yet I knew lots of people who wouldn’t see it. I began to see political ideology as an analog to religious cult thinking - start with the answer, and discard anything that doesn’t support it.

We all do that to some extent - you can’t get through the day if you take every decision as something to be analyzed. However, you need to distinguish when it’s not sweating trivial decisions and becoming a substitute for serious thinking on big issues. Lots of people evidently have trouble with that.

Also, “groupthink” is a real phenomenon - I see it all the time at work. Any time you get a bunch of people together, it occurs, and sometimes in a very negative way. That’s why I try to be the skunk at the garden party - I hate groupthink. I don’t mind when people get upset at some questions that need to be asked.

1 Like

It is after all what has inspired much of what Nietzsche wrote and his disdain for Victorian society at the time

I think for the most part Karl Marx’s views on labor vs the Bourgeoisie was his attempts to narrow down in secular terms the human condition and its perpetual cycles of struggle and representations of power. In some instances his views were too much on generalizations without realizing that the mechanisms of human struggle is way too much nuanced and complicated and always in a state of flux to even put such definitions on them. It is also where academia always fails because the romanticism is the Devil that comes dressed as everything one desires instead of the red face and adorning pitch fork and horns. The reading of such books can never replace nor replicate the real life experiences that were lived they only create simulations of such experiences where ideas get mutilated to take on other imaginary forms.

What people buy into more is what came after, the many people that Karl Marx influenced such as Antonio Gramsci who was a Marx follower and took his principles further birthing the “Oppressed and Oppressor” concepts and associating them to be applied to Cultural Marxism which led past the Post Modernist movement, and spurned on other theories by other writers that brought such concepts of “Intersectionality,” “Moral Relativism,” “Deconstruction” “Nihilism,” “identity Politics,” etc.

Once you understand the weapons of choice and how to use them to turn it against the so called “group thinkers,” being a “garden skunk” as you so aptly put it is not only effective but fun; especially when you can turn their very own weapons against them to mind fuck them into insanity. Did you ever wonder why Progressives are always opting out from having any vigorous debates from their counter parts? I think we know the answer to that as its an obvious one. :grinning:

1 Like

2 Likes

What did the senile pedo mean by this?

1 Like

1 Like

Omg

Biden Heckled in Nantucket!

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

“Lets Go Brandon”

1 Like