Sociopaths Leading The Way To Debt Insolvency, Hyperinflation And Economic Ruin

#1

No one seems to care that a government already over $22 trillion in debt is on schedule to borrow another $990 million this year. All of this is occurring as individual Americans further enslave themselves with higher debt loads and retail stores fail over the inability to pay back the money they borrowed. But there are many reasons to be concerned about government spending.

The debt-based system we live under won’t sustain itself forever. Don’t get us wrong, the sociopaths in government and at the Federal Reserve (central bankers) will prop it up for as long as possible, but it is doomed to fail. That $22 trillion doesn’t include unfunded liabilities either, making the situation even uglier.

According to ABC News, The Treasury Department on Monday projected that borrowing in the April-June quarter would total $30 billion. Borrowing in the July-September period, the final quarter of the budget year will total $160 billion. The $990 billion borrowing total for the 2019 budget year would be down from $1.2 trillion borrowed in 2018. But both years are up from 2017’s $519 billion in government borrowing.

The Foundation for Economic Freedom (FEE) reported that the deficits are likely to double within ten years, making this an issue that could impoverish everyone. There are 5 reasons why the national debt is a big problem and why everyone should be worried about it.

Benefits Spending: Most federal spending is for subsidy and benefit programs, not for activities that increase productivity. Subsidy and benefit programs distort the economy and generally reduce overall output and incomes. Those distortions occur whether spending is financed by debt or current taxes. But the availability of debt financing induces policymakers to increase overall spending, which at the margin goes toward lower-valued activities.

Tax Damage Compounded: When taxes are extracted to pay for government spending, it induces people to change their working and investing activities, which distorts the economy and reduces growth. When spending is financed by borrowing, the tax damage is pushed to the future and compounded with interest costs.

Investment Reduced: Government borrowing may “crowd out” private investment and thus reduce future output and incomes. Economist James Buchanan said: “By financing current public outlay by debt, we are, in effect, chopping up the apple trees for firewood, thereby reducing the yield of the orchard forever.” The crowd out will be reduced if private saving rises to offset government deficits. But the CBO says “the rise in private saving is generally a good deal smaller than the increase in federal borrowing.” Government debt may also deter investment through expectations—businesses will hesitate to invest if rising debt creates fears of tax increases down the road.

Borrowing from Abroad: A decline in private investment due to government borrowing may be avoided if capital is attracted from abroad. Indeed, huge federal borrowing has been facilitated by global capital markets, and today more than 40 percent of the federal debt is held by foreigners. Borrowing from abroad may prevent a fall in domestic investment, but it does not prevent the shifting of costs to future taxpayers. As government debt rises, more of our future earnings will be taxed to pay interest and principal on the government’s debt to foreigners.

Macroeconomic Instability: CBO warns that a “large and continuously growing federal debt would … increase the likelihood of a fiscal crisis in the United States.” Experience shows that high levels of government debt tend to reduce growth and increase financial fragility. In their study of financial crises through history, Carmen Reinhart and Ken Rogoff concluded, “again and again, countries, banks, individuals, and firms take on excessive debt in good times without enough awareness of the risks that will follow when the inevitable recession hits.” Government debt, they found, “is certainly the most problematic, for it can accumulate massively and for long periods without being put in check by markets.”

#2

Also, there is no way that the stock market stays up forever. The higher this thing climbs the worse the crash is going to be.

#3

Isn’t that what happened to Iceland in the midst of the 2008 Crash? (At least, in partial.)